November 28, 2023

Mary Fielding Smith, Life and Legacy

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Mary Fielding Smith was married to Hyrum Smith, the brother of the Prophet Joseph Smith, and mother of the prophet Joseph F. Smith

Mary was born in Bedfordshire, England in 1801.

Mary, along with her siblings, sister Mercy, and brother, Joseph emigrated to Toronto Canada in 1834. Two years after moving to Toronto Canada the siblings were introduced to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by their good friend John Taylor.

The siblings were all baptized into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on May 21, 1836 and moved to Kirtland Ohio to gather with the Saints.

After moving to Kirtland Ohio Hyrum Smith was newly widowed with young children. By suggestion from the prophet Joseph Smith, Hyrum courted Mary Fielding. The two were married on December 24, 1837. Mary took care of Hyrum's young children.

Mary Fielding Smith was pregnant, with the future prophet Joseph F. Smith, when her husband Hyrum Smith was taken to Liberty Jail,. Mary and her family suffered much at the hands of the Missouri mob men, during the time of the "Extermination order" of the Saints.

After, Hyrum and the others escaped from Liberty Jail and the family moved from Missouri to Commerce Illinois, which became known as Nauvoo Illinois.

In Nauvoo Mary and Hyrum had their second child, Martha Smith.

In 1844 Mary's husband, Hyrum was killed in Carthage Jail with his brother Joseph Smith.

After, the death of Hyrum and Joseph Smith the mobs ran the remaining Latter-day Saints from Nauvoo.

Mary Fielding Smith was one of the later groups to leave Nauvoo, because of lack of money and resources. Mary was with the group of Saints who experiences the "Miracle of the Quail".

Mary and her family were in Heber C. Kimballs wagon train company.

While on the journey from Winter Quarters, Mary and her family struggled to cross the plains. At one point Mary blessed a sick oxen to recover, knowing they could not cross the plains without the help of this oxen. Read the story here.

Mary was motivated to beat the captain of the company to the Salt Lake Valley, when the Captain, Cornelius P. Lott, informed Mary she would not be able to cross the plains and would only be a burden on the rest of the company. Read more about her journey here.

At the end of her life Mary Fielding Smith, married Heber C. Kimball.

Mary Fielding Smith was only in the Salt Lake Valley about five years before she caught Pneumonia and died, in 1852. Mary is buried in the Salt Lake City Cemetery.

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